By: Eros

Lauren Chai

EROS

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Description

Souls In Motion 2

Acrylic and oil (neon) on canvas

54x64"


Inspired by Hieronymous Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights, and my personal DMT experience, Souls In Motion series is about the progress we’ve made being accepting of LGBT/interracial love, space advances and what it means to find healing from fear. I also include the Taoist theme of all 10 symbols of long life which was represented in old Korean classical paintings: Sun, clouds, water, rocks, Deer, Cranes, Tortoises, pines, bamboo and Sacred Fungus. My DMT experience has allowed me to be a witness to what I already believed about humans and this universe. I met god. Not the Christian god, not a physical being at all actually, but the presence of his overarching love filled my entire body and heart and he basically took me by the hand and said let me show you what this world is really like. I went through a fast paced montage of the earth coming into creation from space, dinosaurs roaming and dying, fish forms becoming tadpoles walking onto land becoming chimpanzees becoming humans and then I got shot into space and there I was in this vast darkness, but with this overwhelming sense of unconditional love and welcome I was looking back down at everyone on our earth. I witnessed what I already knew, we were all from the universe, made of the same star dust. I’m not exactly religious but I do believe in the power of religion and art and metaphors. Love alone might not solve everything, but it ultimately makes us keep moving forward, progressing, creating and evolving.

 

Souls In Motion 4

Oil (neon pigments) on wood

18x35"


This is the moment where Adam first lays eyes on Eve as a true woman.  His eyes are wide open and electricity must be shooting through his entire body.  Although his pose remains calm, his environment embodies how turned on he is. Obviously we have this happy phallic statue man in the center, busting his nuts, but there are also Korean peaches which represent longevity,  and Korean sacred mushrooms called “bool-lo-cho” which grant immortality. Zooming out a little more, we see creatures everywhere, some painted directly after Hieronymus Bosch’s original “Garden of Earthly Delights” painting, and others further inspired by Korean folk art. There are some creatures freshly crawling out of their primordial soup, and others about to end another's life in order to survive. Each and every element shown here are the ingredients to life, and sex is ultimately sacred because it propels life forward.

 

The Little Death 1

Oil on canvas

18x24"


“The Little Death” is a play between sex and death, the desire to live forever but also the inevitable return of our bodies to nature. I was raised by my grandparents and as they are now near death, they talk about leaving this world all the time. When I think about their death, I think about the entirety of their lives, how they lived it, what actions and decisions they did or did not make. I also see their different emotional reactions to it, my grandma: ready to face death and leave this earth, my grandpa: absolutely terrified but does not want to admit it. I reflect on how I want to live my life and how I want to face death in the end through this series with most of my models being people I know or myself. The different stages of decomposition of the bodies are portrayed as an abstract beautiful mess rather than something to be disgusted or fearful of. The symbols I paint frequently, such as the Korean peach and sacred fungus, are tied to symbols of longevity in Korean classical folk paintings. Back then, these paintings were accessible only to the high class but I paint these symbols today for everyone to enjoy, and I truly feel that I am giving my blessings to the person I am painting. More than just an image, it is an energy. The sacred fungus in particular was highly sought after and emperors would send out troops to look for it in the Korean mountains. It was truly believed to give one eternal youth. Today we take psychedelics as a way to transcend our shared human fate. Procreating is also a temporary transcendence of death and ultimately transcending it in the future as well by passing on DNA. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t afraid of death, but there is an invisible thread that links us to our past and connects us to our fellow humans and the rest of nature. This thought alone helps me see my little death as a part of the bigger universe and I feel a little less scared.

 

Oil on cradled wood

18x18"


“The Little Death” is a play between sex and death, the desire to live forever but also the inevitable return of our bodies to nature. I was raised by my grandparents and as they are now near death, they talk about leaving this world all the time. When I think about their death, I think about the entirety of their lives, how they lived it, what actions and decisions they did or did not make. I also see their different emotional reactions to it, my grandma: ready to face death and leave this earth, my grandpa: absolutely terrified but does not want to admit it. I reflect on how I want to live my life and how I want to face death in the end through this series with most of my models being people I know or myself. The different stages of decomposition of the bodies are portrayed as an abstract beautiful mess rather than something to be disgusted or fearful of. The symbols I paint frequently, such as the Korean peach and sacred fungus, are tied to symbols of longevity in Korean classical folk paintings. Back then, these paintings were accessible only to the high class but I paint these symbols today for everyone to enjoy, and I truly feel that I am giving my blessings to the person I am painting. More than just an image, it is an energy. The sacred fungus in particular was highly sought after and emperors would send out troops to look for it in the Korean mountains. It was truly believed to give one eternal youth. Today we take psychedelics as a way to transcend our shared human fate. Procreating is also a temporary transcendence of death and ultimately transcending it in the future as well by passing on DNA. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t afraid of death, but there is an invisible thread that links us to our past and connects us to our fellow humans and the rest of nature. This thought alone helps me see my little death as a part of the bigger universe and I feel a little less scared.

 

The Little Death 2

Oil on canvas

9x12"


“The Little Death” is a play between sex and death, the desire to live forever but also the inevitable return of our bodies to nature. I was raised by my grandparents and as they are now near death, they talk about leaving this world all the time. When I think about their death, I think about the entirety of their lives, how they lived it, what actions and decisions they did or did not make. I also see their different emotional reactions to it, my grandma: ready to face death and leave this earth, my grandpa: absolutely terrified but does not want to admit it. I reflect on how I want to live my life and how I want to face death in the end through this series with most of my models being people I know or myself. The different stages of decomposition of the bodies are portrayed as an abstract beautiful mess rather than something to be disgusted or fearful of. The symbols I paint frequently, such as the Korean peach and sacred fungus, are tied to symbols of longevity in Korean classical folk paintings. Back then, these paintings were accessible only to the high class but I paint these symbols today for everyone to enjoy, and I truly feel that I am giving my blessings to the person I am painting. More than just an image, it is an energy. The sacred fungus in particular was highly sought after and emperors would send out troops to look for it in the Korean mountains. It was truly believed to give one eternal youth. Today we take psychedelics as a way to transcend our shared human fate. Procreating is also a temporary transcendence of death and ultimately transcending it in the future as well by passing on DNA. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t afraid of death, but there is an invisible thread that links us to our past and connects us to our fellow humans and the rest of nature. This thought alone helps me see my little death as a part of the bigger universe and I feel a little less scared.

Authenticity

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